Finishing Touches: Alternate Quilting Designs for a Fresh Look

Quilting motifs can completely change the finish of a quilt

It never fails to amaze me how the same pattern can yield such different results depending on the quilter. That’s one of the reasons I enjoy our color options. Many times, I’ve done a double-take—wait, that’s the same quilt?

Pam Boswell’s Filigree in McCall’s Quilting July/August 2019 issue is one of those. Her bee-inspired fabrics give the quilt a distinct palette. Changing it to a patriotic palette causes different elements to pop.

Same pattern, different palette, dramatic difference.

Same pattern, different palette, dramatic difference.

In our recent issues, we’ve been exploring alternate quilting treatments as well. Pam’s Filigree is one of those. Pam chose straight-line quilting, which adds an energetic quality to the design, perfect for those busy bees in the print.

Straight line quilting adds energy.

Straight line quilting adds energy.

We wondered how Pam’s pattern would look with a wreath design, and chose Versatile Ivy to test it.

The circular pattern softens the geometry of the patchwork, and would frame the center blocks nicely. The ivy leaves play perfectly with the bee fabric, giving it a garden twist.

The wreath design softens the look of the quilt.

The wreath design softens the look of the quilt.

Our “Finishing Touches” pattern from Quiltmaker July/August 2019 is Nancy Mahoney’s Park Avenue. The bright, zesty batiks could really work with just about any quilting motif. Nancy’s quilter Terri Taylor chose a swirling all-over design, and it complements the patchwork well.

This all-over quilting is ideal for the scrappy-looking batik quilt.

This all-over quilting is ideal for the scrappy-looking batik quilt.

For our alternate quilting, we went with another leaf-y design, Garden Vine. The diagonal vines created a path in the patchwork from block to block, which we liked.

A diagonal path is created.

A diagonal path is created.

In the July/August 2019 issue of Love of Quilting, we took a look at Parade of Roses. The quilting on Lori Marvel’s quilt is spectacular and complements the blocks and prints well.

Parade of Roses features custom quilting.

Parade of Roses features custom quilting.

In the quilt blocks, the straight lines converge to create a checkerboard cross-hatch in the corners, which is absolutely charming.

Straight lines create a cross-hatch in the corners.

Straight lines create a cross-hatch in the corners.

The quilting in the border uses straight lines to full effect; by stopping short at the rose motif, the quilting design creates a relief, causing those roses to pop.

By stopping short of the motif, the quilt creates a raised effect

By stopping short of the motif, the quilt creates a raised effect

We liked how the fabric’s rose motif played with the geometric designs, so we selected Gibraltar Quilting motif. We were pleased by the resulting trellis effect, and really enjoyed how the LeMoyne star shape in the quilting interacted with the pinwheels in the patchwork.

The strong geometry plays well with the floral prints.

The strong geometry plays well with the floral prints.

To download free PDFs of our finishing touches quilting design, visit the issue web pages for McCall’s Quilting July/August 2019, Quiltmaker July/August 2019, and Love of Quilting July/August 2019.

Happy quilting!

Vanessa Lyman

Check out the complete issues for pattern information and even more inspiration!


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